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Potted Herb Shelf

Potted Herb Shelf

Fresh herbs are a great asset to have in the kitchen or on the patio, and are the perfect companion for a creative cook to have available at their fingertips. Now you can display your favourite selection of fine herbs as tastefully as the meals they enhance.

herb shelfby Rob Brown

Fresh herbs are a great asset to have in the kitchen or on the patio, and are the perfect companion for a creative cook to have available at their fingertips. Now you can display your favourite selection of fine herbs as tastefully as the meals they enhance.

What You'll Need:


Tools

  • table saw 1346-634
  • band saw 1345-341
  • jointer
  • planer 1332-533
  • hand plane 1043-114
  • sander 1262-369
  • drill 1239-213
  • drill press 1334-595
  • router 1258-515
  • router table 1358-417
  • 1/8" and 5/8" diameter straight router bit
  • #8 screw setter 1227-513
  • hole saw (with mandrel) 1266-640
  • hand saw 1063-815clay pots
  • hand plane 1046-344
  • sanding block 1061-282
  • chisel 1020-807
  • clamps 1022-761
  • tape measure 1048-330
  • try square 1070-305


Materials

  • 2 x 8 lumber (36" long)
  • contrasting lumber (36" x 11/4" x 11/4")
  • Download Instructionscontrasting inlay strip (40" x 1" x 1/8")
  • #8 x 2" exterior screws
  • exterior keyhole brackets 2129-526
  • 4" clay pots (5) 5059-607
  • exterior glue 2020-869
  • exterior finish 1877-909
  • sandpaper 1061, 1078


Here's How

  1. Select a fairly clear 2 x 8 board for the shelf and cut it to 341/2" long.

  2. Joint one face, then plane to 11/8" thick.

  3. Joint one edge, and then rip to final width.

  4. Install 1/8" diameter straight bit in router table so it extends 1/8" above the table's surface.

  5. Set fence 3/16" away from the inside edge of the bit.

  6. Rout two inlay grooves in the front edge of the shelf. (photo 1)

  7. Dress a piece of contrasting inlay wood 1" wide x 40" long.

  8. Plane or rip it to fit snugly, but easily, inside the routed groove. (photo 2)

  9. Rip it in half on a band saw, producing two inlay strips.

  10. Apply glue to the grooves, insert the inlay strips and let dry. (photo 3)

  11. Hand plane the inlay strips flush with the shelf edge and trim their ends flush.

  12. Layout five holes centered on the shelf's width, with even space between. (photo 4)

  13. Install a 4" hole saw in your drill press.

  14. Adjust the table's height so the centre bit drills into the table, but the hole saw's teeth do not.

  15. Position the shelf for the first hole, clamp the shelf in place, and drill the first hole.

  16. Flip the shelf over, position it, clamp it in place, and finish drilling the hole. This double-sided drilling process drastically reduces tearout. (photo 5)

  17. Drill the four remaining holes, clamping the shelf in place each time.

  18. Cut the two posts to size.

  19. Layout the two notches on the back edge of the shelf and cut them with a hand saw, or on-edge with a table saw and mitre gauge. Ensure the inner edges are square and even when finished.

  20. Ensure the posts fit in the notches nicely. Adjust the post dimension slightly, if necessary.

  21. Mark where the posts meet the shelf and drill two screw clearance holes in the posts between the lines. Countersink for the screw heads. (photo 6)

  22. To hang the shelf on a wall, countersink keyhole brackets into the backs of the posts. Use a router or a drill and chisel to create the recesses for the brackets.

  23. Sand the posts and shelf, and ease their edges.

  24. Glue and screw the posts to the shelf. (photo 7)

  25. Cut the angled braces to size and drill a screw clearance hole and countersink on the bottom side of the brace.

  26. With the braces screwed into the underside of the shelf, mark where they meet the posts.

  27. Drill and countersink through the backs of the posts, slightly into the braces, ensuring the screw will not break through the visible face of the brace.

  28. Remove the braces, break their edges and sand their surfaces.

  29. Apply glue to their ends and permanently attach them with screws. (photo 8)

  30. Apply a few coats of finish to the project, being sure to coat the end grain well.

  31. Attach the keyhole brackets to the backs of the posts with screws.


Inlay Groove

Rout the 1/8" inlay grooves on a router table.

photo 1

Inlay Material

Once the inlay stock has been planed to thickness, split it into two pieces.

photo 2

Glue It In Place

Apply glue to the grooves and install both inlay strips.

photo 3

Mark the Holes

Centre the holes on the shelf's width, and space them evenly across the board.

photo 4

Clamp and Drill

Drill nearly all the way through one side, then flip the shelf over and finish boring the hole from the other side to reduce tearout.

photo 5

Screw Clearance Holes

After marking where the posts will be positioned on the shelf, drill two screw clearance holes between the lines.

photo 6

Attach the Posts

Glue and screw the posts to the shelf with exterior screws. (Keyhole brackets not shown. See website drawings for more details.)

photo 7

Attach the Braces

Glue and screw the braces in place. Be sure the screws don't come through the finished surface.

photo 8


Rob Brown designs and builds custom furniture, and is editor of Canadian Woodworking and Home Improvement magazine.
www.canadianwoodworking.com

Canadian Woodworking & Home Improvement